The Catholic University of America

Courses

Spring Semester 2017

 

European Studies

EURO 201

1/09 - 5/06

European Culture (3 cr.) 

01 

SHAHAN 410

Tues Thu  

Jan 09 - May 06

12:40pm 
- 1:55pm

   

Arslan, G.

García-Donoso, D.

O’Riordan, J.

The course studies the expression of multiculturalism and questions of national identity in literature and film from three distinct regions of Europe with a focus on topics such as national, international, and transnational literature; national versus European identity; cultural and ethnic stereotypes and xenophobia. Readings will focus on the role of the foreigner or ‘Other’ in national literature and film, and on artistic works produced by so-called migrants or people with migration background. Taught in English in three connected modules by three different instructors. The course counts as a humanities and literature elective; it is one of the gateway courses for the Certificate in European Studies.


Art 

ART 212

1/09 - 5/06

History of Art: From the Renaissance to the Modern Age (3 cr.) 

01 

SALV 204

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Heimann, N.

A survey of Western art from the fifteenth century to the present. Investigates Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and Modern masterworks in terms of their formal development and cultural context through readings, lectures, class discussions, and field trips. Special emphasis on developing skills of visual literacy and critical thinking. Formerly 302.

 

ART 311

1/09 - 5/06

Byzantium & the West: Cultural and Artistic Exchange in Medieval Europe, c. 1000 ¿ 1300 (3 cr.) 

01 

SALV 204

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

5:10 pm 
- 6:25 pm

Karterouli, K.

This course will examine Eastern and Western cultural interaction in the High and Late Middle Ages. It will focus on the reception of Byzantine art in medieval Italy and transalpine Europe, and will include the Christian encounter with Islamic art and precious objects. It will examine these cross-cultural exchanges and the methodological approaches that scholars have developed in tracing the reception of Byzantine and Islamic imagery and objects. Among the themes that will be addressed: the circulation and afterlife of objects, the reception mechanisms of influence, appropriation, assimilation, and hybridity, Christian devotion in Byzantium and the West, social processes such as gift-giving, diplomacy, and the establishment of political ideologies.

 

ART 325

1/09 - 5/06

Rococo to Romanticism (3 cr.) 

01 

SALV 204

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

12:40 pm 
- 1:55 pm

Crosson, D.

Examines the Neoclassical and Romantic movements in Western art and culture from 1750 to 1850. Charts the impact of the Academie, the role of classical art and its early tradition, and the rise of the avant garde. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable, Turner and Friedrich.

 


English

ENG 250

1/09 - 5/06

Medieval Pathways (3 cr.) 

01 

MARI 131

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Kopar, L.

This interdisciplinary course explores the complexity of the medieval world (ca. 300-1500) as a way of introducing students to Medieval Studies. The course introduces multiple different modes of inquiry, or pathways, to the Middle Ages. Team-taught by several instructors, the course focuses on a different unifying theme each year. Students examine both material and written sources, and participate in multiple field trips to receive a hands-on introduction to Medieval Studies and to the many resources on campus and in Washington, D.C. The longer class session is used for occasional off-campus visits. Otherwise, the class will meet twice a week for 75 minutes each. The course serves as a gateway to the Medieval & Byzantine Studies major and minor (as MDST) and may fulfill the Arts & Sciences humanities requirement (as HIST or MDST) or literature requirement (as ENG).

 

ENG 355

1/09 - 5/06

Medieval Monsters (3 cr.) 

01 

GOWN 401

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Kopar, L.

No description available

 

French 

FREN 210

1/09 - 5/06

France and Germany and the Construction of the European Community (3 cr.) 

01 

SHAH 303

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Heimonet, J.

The course is about the crucial role of France and Germany at the end of WWII, leading to the development of the European Community. Students will study the international context at the time of the cold war from and within which the European Union was born. They will explore how after three wars in less than a century, the french-German cooperation in culture, economy, politics, has manages to secure peace and harmony in a continent previously shattered by conflicts.Taught in English. Based on lectures, class discussions and video material.

 

FREN 301

1/09 - 5/06

Society and Culture in the French-Speaking World (3 cr.) 

01 

MCGIV 009

Wed Fri  

Jan 09 - May 06

11:10 am 
- 12:25 pm

Arnaud, C.

This course provides students with the necessary historical background and social and cultural context to analyze contemporary issues in the French-speaking world. Students will study the appropriate historical and contextual framework in order to critically analyze contemporary issues. By completing a series of modules students will become familiar with both the key historical events and the contemporary debates in the French-speaking world. Required for majors and recommended for any students who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses. Fulfills humanities and literature requirement. Prerequisite: 203-204, 211.

 

 

German  

GER 210

1/09 - 5/06

France and Germany and the Construction of the European Community (3 cr.) 

01 

SHAH 303

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Heimonet, J.

The course is about the crucial role of France and Germany at the end of WWII, leading to the development of the European Community. Students will study the international context at the time of the cold war from and within which the European Union was born. They will explore how after three wars in less than a century, the french-German cooperation in culture, economy, politics, has manages to secure peace and harmony in a continent previously shattered by conflicts.Taught in English. Based on lectures, class discussions and video material.

 

GER 220

1/09 - 5/06

Vienna in Literature and the Arts (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 204

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Sheffer, A.

This course, taught in English, explores the city of Vienna, home of Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, Strauss, Mahler, Schönberg, Wittgenstein, Freud, Klimt, Kokoschka, Schiele, the Habsburgs, Kaffeehaus culture, Sachertorte, Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), and The Third Man, through literature, film, architecture, art, and music.

 

GER 301

1/09 - 5/06

Society and Culture in the German-Speaking World (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 322AB

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Arslan, G.

This course provides students with the necessary historical background and social and cultural context to analyze contemporary issues in the German-speaking world. Students will study the appropriate historical and contextual framework in order to critically analyze contemporary issues. By completing a series of modules students will become familiar with both the key historical events and the contemporary debates in the German-speaking world. Required for majors and recommended for any students who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses. Fulfills humanities and literature requirement. Prerequisite: 203 or 204. 

 

History 

HIST 139

1/09 - 5/06

Monarchy in European History (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B031

Mon Wed  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Sherman, C.

This course, which is open only to first years and sophomores, examines many facets of the institution of monarchy across European history, including theoretical justifications for it, its relationship with republics, commonwealths, and empires, and the dynastic family strategies employed in its creation and defense. Along the way we will consider the rituals of royalty, the roles of queens, the functions of aristocracy in monarchies, the problems of regents and cadet branches, episodes of regicide and revolution, child-rearing theories applied to heirs apparent, and the unstable lines between kings, despots, and tyrants. The course will begin with kings in ancient Greece and end with the perhaps surprising vitality of monarchy in modern Europe. Readings will include political theory, chronicles, diaries, folk tales, and letters, and we will also examine the images, iconography, and propaganda of kingship.

 

HIST 223

1/09 - 5/06

The History of France: From the Gauls to De Gaulle (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B031

Mon Wed  

Jan 09 - May 06

11:10 am 
- 12:00 pm

Sherman, C.

 

31 

GIBB B031

Fri  

Jan 09 - May 06

11:10 am 
- 12:00 pm

Sherman, C.

 

32 

MCGIV 004

Fri  

Jan 09 - May 06

11:10 am 
- 12:00 pm

Sherman, C.

This course covers the political, social, cultural, and religious history of France, from the ancient Gallic tribes who fought Caesar to the long-haired and then do-nothing Merovingian kings; from Charlemagne through Louis XIV to Napoleon; from the wars of religion to perpetual revolution; from the mission to civilize French peasants to a ‘civilizing’ mission cast out over Europe and the entire globe.  A wide array of material culture will be used in class: music, art, coins, architecture, fashion, battle maps and fortifications, and, of course, food.

 

HIST 334A

1/09 - 5/06

Modern Germany, 1870 to the Present (3 cr.)  

01 

HANN 132

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Klimo, A.

This course provides an overview of the history of Modern Germany from the foundation of the nation state in the second half of the 19th century to its dissolution at the end of World War II. In addition, the years following its dissolution in 1945 are also discussed, as well as long-term developments regarding gender, sexuality, religion or militarism. Apart from dealing with the general political, economic and social history of Germany, special emphasis is laid on the study of the different cultures of the succeeding German states.

 

HIST 346

1/09 - 5/06

Triumph and Catastrophe: The Habsburg Empire (1792-1920). (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B031

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

12:40 pm 
- 1:55 pm

Klimo, A.

Until its sudden collapse in 1918, the Empire of the Habsburg dynasty dominated the central part of Europe. No less than 12 European states of today share this legacy. Some compare the governance of the ¿multinational¿ Habsburg Empire with its complex structure of imperial, national, regional, provincial, and local institutions and their complicated interplay with the current processes and challenges of European integration. But the history of the Habsburg Empire goes way beyond the simplistic tale of growing nationalist tensions which led to the outbreak of the Great War. Austria-Hungary was also a laboratory of modern experience and modern ideas and ideologies, from antisemitism to psychoanalysis - ideas which radically shaped the short and catastrophic 20th century.

 

HIST 413

1/09 - 5/06

Seminar: English Crime, 1200-1800 (3 cr.)  

01 

NBIO 154

Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

3:40 pm 
- 6:10 pm

Poos, L.

This seminar’s aim is to help participants develop critical skills as part of their development as students of history, as well as to provide practice for senior thesis projects. In order to accomplish those goals, the seminar consists of an in-depth exercise in looking at approaches, methods, sources, and ways of understanding historical problems, worked out in the context of a specific topic or subject: in this case, the history of crime in England, circa 1200-1800. Studying crime lends itself to many approaches: legal, sociological, statistical, comparative (across times and places), and cultural/literary, to name only a few. Emphasis will be upon analyzing primary sources (especially court cases) alongside wide-ranging examples from recent writing about the history of crime.

 

 

Italian

ITAL 226

1/09 - 5/06

Fascism, Racism, and War in Italian Literature (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG G022

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Lucamante, S.

This course offers an analysis of the complex legacy of Risorgimento in the 20th century Italian nation. Immediate prospects of prosperity for the young country had to face, in fact, the reality of fascism, the rise of the figure of dictator Benito Mussolini to a public myth, racism, two wars and the period called Resistenza. By braiding the reality of historical facts and the reality of artistic artifacts, namely history and literature, students learn and examine representations of some of the most complex events leading up to the republic of 1946 and a new Constitution. Mussolini¿s political speeches will be analyzed and measured against the background of a young country still in dire need of a political compass, not entirely devoid, however, of the intellectual ability to reject totalitarianism as philosopher Benedetto Croce did throughout his career. Racism and resistance to the regime as evidenced by the novels by Italo Calvino and Beppe Fenoglio will constitute some of the enlightening readings of the semester along with Primo Levi’s reflections on his experience in the Auschwitz Lager in If This is a Man. Taught in English. Satisfies requirements for humanities, and literature.

 

ITAL 233

1/09 - 5/06

The Myth of Childhood in Italian Cinema (3 cr.) 

01 

OBYL G001

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Lucamante, S.

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the important theme of childhood in Italian Cinema. In fact, this topic is very frequented by Italian film makers, as the child’s point of view is present in many trends and periods of Italian cinema which often utilizes literary texts as its point of departure to develop new perspectives on childhood and Italian society in its transformations. In this course, students will be offered a unique chance of analyzing the theme of childhood in mainly two periods of Italian cinema. One, the famous period dubbed as Neo-realism, will make up the first part of the semester. We will analyze films by Vittorio De Sica, Luchino Visconti, and Roberto Rossellini. Films from postmodern cinema will constitute the second and final part of the semester. In this part of the course, we will screen films by Gianni Amelio, Oscar winner Gabriele Salvatores, and Cristina Comencini. The idea behind this division is to compare and contrast these two very different cinematic expressions which originate from different periods of Italian society and its history. The result I hope to reach is a fruitful semester after which students will be familiar and comfortable with Italian film reading and related cinematic techniques, with the desire to further pursue studies in both. Taught in English. Satisfies requirements for humanities.

 

 

Media 

MDIA 210

8/31 - 12/19

Italian Women Artists (3 cr.) 

01 

HANN 105

Tues Thurs  

Aug 31 - Dec 19

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Lucamante, S.

This course examines the evolution of female subjectivity in 20th and 21st century Italian culture, film, and literature from Unification and Fascism to modern Democracy through the works of major female writers and filmmakers. In the first module of the course, students study how Italian women writers Sibilla Aleramo, Anna Banti, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and the 1926 Nobel prize winner for literature Grazia Deledda perceive societal changes in their novels. The second part examines such changes through the lens of female filmmakers, Francesca Comencini and Alina Marazzi amongst others. Discussing and analyzing the literary and cinematic narratives of the Self, identity, relationships and sisterhood, gender and maternity, politics and family will be the core of our work. Taught in English. Satisfies literature and humanities requirements. Cross-listed with ITAL 210.

 

MDIA 307

8/31 - 12/19

The Splendor of Rome in Literature & Film (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG G024

Tues Thurs  

Aug 31 - Dec 19

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Lucamante, S.

Famous twins Romulus and Remus were merely the first two artists who shaped Rome, one of the most beautiful, complex, and recounted cities in the world! The Eternal City, as it is often referred to, is the physical embodiment of a complex identity as it the point of reference for many artists and travelers who have journeyed and relentlessly tried to construct images for its beauty. During this virtual walk through Rome’s (particularly modern) history, students will encounter works revealing the singular allure of the space of the city that is twice a capital. From the work of world-renown directors Federico Fellini and Vittorio De Sica to that of writers Alberto Moravia and Amara Lakhous, students will enjoy the dolce vita (sweet life) and the cultural import of Rome in poetry, in music, in the visual arts, and cinema. Taught in English. Same as MDIA 307. Satisfies requirements for HUM and LIT.

 

 

Politics

POL 367

1/09 - 5/06

France, Germany, and the EU (3 cr.)  

01 

MCCT 208

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

TBA

No description available

 

POL 449

1/09 - 5/06

Eastern and Central Europe PE (3 cr.)  

01 

PANG 322AB

Mon Wed  

Jan 09 - May 06

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

TBA

           
           

No description available


Spanish 

SPAN 215

1/09 - 5/06

Spain Through Art, Music and Literature (3 cr.) 

01 

GIBB B030

Tues Thurs  

Jan 09 - May 06

12:40 pm 
- 1:55 pm

Damiani, B.

 

This innovative and interdisciplinary course takes the student to a cultural and literary journey through Spain by examining the historic, geographic and generational diversity of various Spanish artistic forms from the Middle Ages to modern times. Lectures and class discussion will complement a wide spectrum of audio-visual material that will show the major characteristics of early Iberian iconography, the Renaissance works of Luis de Morales, the mannerism style of El Greco, the baroque portrait artistry of Diego Velázquez, the revolutionary and visionary Rococo expressions of Francisco Goya, the Impressionism and Post-Impressionism of Sorolla, and the major works of the 20th century by Picasso and Dalí. The course will furthermore offer a discussion of the origins of Spanish music and present various samples of the vibrant and long history of music in Spain from the Gregorian chant and the xarchas to flamenco and regional folk music to contemporary pop music. Completing the course will be a reading and textual analysis of key parts of major literary texts, among them the Cid, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, and the more modern works by Galdós, Valera, Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, and Camilo José Cela.