The Catholic University of America

Courses

Fall Semester 2017

 

European Studies


Art 

ART 324

8/28 - 12/16

Realism, Impressionism, and the Birth of Modernism (3 cr.) 

01 

SALV 204

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Heimann, N.

A focused, illustrated study of two brilliant movements in modern art history through the work of some of the greatest artists of the mid-to-late nineteenth century, including Millet, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Renoir, and Rodin. Addresses the innovative production of these artists in relation to the tumultuous cultural and political circumstances of the late 1800s. Explores the pivotal influence of Realism and Impressionism upon the development of Vanguard Modernism. Students are encouraged to utilize the outstanding resources of local art collections. Readings, illustrated lectures, class discussions, and field trips to local collections.

 

ART 335

8/28 - 12/16

Western Medieval Art and Architecture (3 cr.) 

01 

SALV 204

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

5:10 pm 
- 6:25 pm

Karterouli, K.

Surveys the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in Western Europe, from the age of Charlemagne through the Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, and from England to the borders of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider secular and vernacular art forms in addition to art created for the use and glory of the Christian church.

 

ART 375

8/28 - 12/16

Rethinking the Renaissance: Artistic Exchange Between North and South (3 cr.) 

01 

OFF CAMPUS

Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

11:10 am 
- 1:40 pm

TBA

This course examines art made between ca. 1400-1600 that has traditionally been described as belonging to the Italian Renaissance (that is, art made on the Italian peninsula) and to the "Northern Renaissance" (that is, art made in what is today the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany and Austria). While these two subjects are often taught as separate historical and artistic phenomena, this course will consider possible alternatives to this prevalent model. By focusing on artists and art works that traveled in both directions across the Alps, students will have the chance to consider a more inclusive definition of the Renaissance. 


English 

ENG 206

8/28 - 12/16

Grimms' Fairy Tales in their European Context (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 205

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Sheffer, A.

This course analyzes literary fairy tales from Europe written between 1600 and today. Although our focus is on literary tales, the course is interdisciplinary--we will investigate other storytelling forms, such as film, paintings, and even memes. To lay the groundwork for our analyses, we will trace the history of the fairy tale in Italy, France, Germany, and Denmark from oral traditions to print and film. We will study some of the more common motifs in fairy tales:  the relationship of socioeconomic class and power, family conflicts, the quest, punishment, and violence as well as the transmission of tales and their symbols (Semiotics/Memetics). These motifs will be related to political, economic, social, and cultural life in early modern and Enlightenment Europe, but we will also consider their possible continuing relevance today.

 

ENG 231

8/28 - 12/16

The History of English Literature I (3 cr.) 

01 

AQU 102

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

2:10 pm 
- 3:00 pm

Kopar, L.

 

31 

OBYL G001

Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

1:40 pm 
- 2:30 pm

TBA

 

32 

OBYL 220

Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:30 pm

TBA

 

33 

OBYL G001

Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

2:40 pm 
- 3:30 pm

TBA

A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. 231 starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century; 232 begins with the Romantic movement and closes with the moderns. Covers a broad range of materials, also pauses at regular intervals to consider individual works in depth.

 

ENG 351

8/28 - 12/16

Chaucer and His Age I (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG G003

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Gibbons, D.

First semester: a study of the major genres of medieval literature based on selections from the Canterbury Tales and other works; second semester, the major forms and tradition of Middle English literature, with special attention to Chaucer’s minor poems, the Troilus, and/or selected religious plays and popular lyrics. Either course may be used by undergraduate English concentrators to fulfill their requirement for a semester of Chaucer.

 

ENG 378

8/28 - 12/16

Italy in American and British Literature (Rome) (3 cr.) 

01 

ABROAD

Tues  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:00 pm 
- 5:50 pm

Locatelli, M.

 No description available

 

French 

FREN 220

8/28 - 12/16

Pirates of the Caribbean in Atlantic Literature (3 cr.) 

01 

MCMA 202

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

2:10 pm 
- 3:25 pm

Stieber, C.

Whether as freebooters, buccaneers, corsairs, privateers, marauders, swashbucklers or sea rovers, pirates have long captured the Atlantic imagination. But why? This course interrogates the concept of piracy from its earliest manifestations to our present day. We will focus primarily on the "golden age" of Atlantic piracy in the 17th and 18th centuries and its artistic re-imagining in the 19th and 20th centuries. Taught in English. Fulfills humanities and literature requirements.

 

FREN 300

8/28 - 12/16

Thinking Critically: Literature, Film, and Media in the French-Speaking World (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 302

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Matar, M.

French 300 focuses on the acquisition of analytical skills through close reading and textual analysis. Here "text" is used in its broadest sense; students will become familiar with and able to analyze a host of literary genres and types of texts, from novels and plays to political tracts, propaganda, paintings and film. In addition to honing students' analytical skills, this course is designed to introduce students to some of the key texts in French and Francophone literature and culture. Taught in French.

 

German

GER 230

8/28 - 12/16

Grimms' Fairy Tales (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 205

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Sheffer, A.

This course analyzes literary fairy tales from Europe written between 1600 and today. Although our focus is on literary tales, the course is interdisciplinary--we will investigate other storytelling forms, such as film, paintings, and even memes. To lay the groundwork for our analyses, we will trace the history of the fairy tale in Italy, France, Germany, and Denmark from oral traditions to print and film. We will study some of the more common motifs in fairy tales:  the relationship of socioeconomic class and power, family conflicts, the quest, punishment, and violence as well as the transmission of tales and their symbols (Semiotics/Memetics). These motifs will be related to political, economic, social, and cultural life in early modern and Enlightenment Europe, but we will also consider their possible continuing relevance today.

 

GER 250

8/28 - 12/16

Berlin in Literature and Film (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG G022

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Bornholdt, C.

For the last 150 years, the city of Berlin has been the political and cultural center of Germany and Europe. The course explores the turbulent history of the city through its architecture, literature, films, and the creative arts. Discussions will focus on Berlin as the capital city (Prussian monarchy, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, and contemporary Germany); the divided and reunited city; Berlin as a meeting point for diverse religions, ethnicities, and ideologies; and the city’s multicultural history. An optional one-week trip to Berlin during spring break 2018 will be available for interested students. The course will be taught in English; counts as a literature, humanities, and European Studies elective.

 

GER 300

8/28 - 12/16

Thinking Critically: Literature, Film, and Media in the German-Speaking World (3 cr.) 

01 

MCGIV 011

Wed Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Sheffer, A.

German 300 focuses on the acquisition of analytical skills through close reading and textual analysis. Here "text" is used in its broadest sense; students will become familiar with and able to analyze a host of literary genres and types of texts, from novels and plays to political tracts, propaganda, paintings, and film. In addition to honing students' analytical skills, this course is designed to introduce students to some of the key texts in German-language literature and culture. This course is required for majors and recommended for any student who will enroll in 300-level and higher courses in German.

 

GER 488

8/28 - 12/16

Special Topics Seminar (3 cr.) 

01 

TBA

 

Aug 28 - Dec 16

TBA

Rudolf, K.

This seminar is an intensive research seminar that focuses on a topic related to German literature[s] and culture[s]. The seminar will help students develop strong research skills (identifying a problem, defining a thesis, establishing a coherent methodological approach, selecting relevant primary and secondary sources, mastering MLA style). Students will also practice to prepare and deliver scholarly oral presentation and prepare a 10-pages seminar paper. The specific course content varies. Required for all graduating seniors. Prerequisite: Graduating senior or instructor’s permission. May be repeated with different content for credit. 

 

History

HIST 235

8/28 - 12/16

Medieval World (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B031

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

2:10 pm 
- 3:00 pm

Jansen, K.

 

31 

GIBB B030

Fri  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

2:10 pm 
- 3:00 pm

Granger, M.

This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others (Pagans, Jews and Muslims) as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

 

HIST 316

8/28 - 12/16

England After the Black Death (3 cr.)  

01 

MCMA 112

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

12:40 pm 
- 1:55 pm

Poos, L.

English history circa 1300-1500 witnessed major upheavals and transformations. The course begins by considering the Black Death (and, more generally, the role of disease in history) and covers this period topically, emphasizing political, social and economic, and cultural change and analysis of primary sources.

 

HIST 323

8/28 - 12/16

The Renaissance, 1300-1530 (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B032

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Minnich, N.

A survey of the intellectual and cultural life of western Europe from 1300 to 1530, with particular attention to the revival of classical literary and artistic forms and to the emergence of a new view of human nature and of the world.

 

HIST 338A

8/28 - 12/16

The Idea of Europe. European Integration since 1914 (3 cr.)  

01 

GIBB B031

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Klimo, A.

After WWII, and in the context of the Cold War, Europeans witnessed the transnational integration process that resulted in the foundation of the European Union (EU) in 1992. However, the road to the EU was long and cumbersome, and beset by conflicts and crises. The decision to limit national sovereignty for the sake of a union of European nations was contested from the beginning. For that reason European integration has remained a fragile enterprise. This course focuses on historical process by which European identity was built. The first part of the course provides an overview of the debates on European integration since 1914. The second half of the course focuses on more current issues related to EU institutions and the problem of creating an EU identity.

 

HIST 377A

8/28 - 12/16

World War II in Europe (3 cr.)  

01 

TBA

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

5:10 pm 
- 6:25 pm

TBA

Drawing on military, political, social and cultural approaches, this course offers a wide-ranging description and analysis of the European theater of war, 1939-1945. One major goal is to describe the ways ideology affected the balance of power, then influenced strategy, operations, and tactics. Further, the course will examine the ways that large-scale war acts as a revolutionary social and cultural force, and the ways that the Second World War created what we think of as the modern world, not only in political terms (the roots of the Cold War; the collapse of European imperialism) but also in radically changing the relationship of the individual to the State. The course will assess and challenge many of the myths surrounding the war, such as resistance and collaboration, and illuminate the moral compromises necessary to survive in occupied societies of Europe. Finally, we will challenge some of the received ideas about the war, such as the relative importance of campaigns in East and West and Asia. The construction of historical memory will feature as a theme with implications to all study of modern history and how we receive our understanding of the past.

 

Italian

ITAL 210

8/28 - 12/16

Italian Women Artists (3 cr.) 

01 

GIBB B030

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Lucamante, S.

 

31 

AQU 102

Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

6:00 pm 
- 8:00 pm

Lucamante, S.

This course examines the evolution of female subjectivity in 20th and 21st century Italian culture, film, and literature from Unification and Fascism to modern Democracy through the works of major female writers and filmmakers. In the first module of the course, students study how Italian women writers Sibilla Aleramo, Anna Banti, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and the Nobel prize winner for literature Grazia Deledda perceive societal changes in their novels. The second part examines such changes through the lens of female filmmakers, Cristina Comencini and Francesca Archibugi amongst others. Discussing and analyzing the literary and cinematic narratives of the Self, identity, relationships and sisterhood, gender and maternity, politics and family will be the core of our work. Taught in English. Satisfies literature and humanities requirements. Cross-listed with Media Studies MDIA 210.

 

ITAL 488

8/28 - 12/16

Senior Special Topics Seminar (3 cr.) 

01 

NBIO 257

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

11:10 am 
- 12:25 pm

Lazzari, L.

No description available

 

Media 

MDIA 210

8/28 - 12/16

Italian Women Artists (3 cr.) 

01 

GIBB B030

Tues Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

9:40 am 
- 10:55 am

Lucamante, S.

 

31 

AQU 102

Thurs  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

6:00 pm 
- 8:00 pm

Lucamante, S.

This course examines the evolution of female subjectivity in 20th and 21st century Italian culture, film, and literature from Unification and Fascism to modern Democracy through the works of major female writers and filmmakers. In the first module of the course, students study how Italian women writers Sibilla Aleramo, Anna Banti, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and the 1926 Nobel prize winner for literature Grazia Deledda perceive societal changes in their novels. The second part examines such changes through the lens of female filmmakers, Francesca Comencini and Alina Marazzi amongst others. Discussing and analyzing the literary and cinematic narratives of the Self, identity, relationships and sisterhood, gender and maternity, politics and family will be the core of our work. Taught in English. Satisfies literature and humanities requirements. Cross-listed with ITAL 210.

 

Spanish

SPAN 327

8/28 - 12/16

Going Rogue: Spanish Picaresque (3 cr.) 

01 

PANG 322AB

Mon Wed  

Aug 28 - Dec 16

3:40 pm 
- 4:55 pm

Mcmahon, C.

No description available